Major Howard Egan Family Foundation

Sailor Rope Maker Captain in Nauvoo Legion Bodyguard to Joseph Smith Mormon Battalion Envoy Captain of the 9th 10 of the original 1847 Pioneer Vanguard Company Gold Rush Trading Post Owner Trail Blazer Cattle Drover Major in Utah War Pony Express Rider & Superintendent of Line from Salt Lake to California Stage Station Owner Friend & Missionary to Indians Salt Lake City Policeman Bodyguard to Brigham Young
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Hyrum William Egan

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Hyrum William Egan

Birth: 24 July 1850, Salt Lake City, Utah.
Father: Howard Egan  Mother:Mary Ann Tuttle
Death: 4 March 1888, Albion, Idaho.  Died at age 38.
Wife: Mary Salome Preator (1851-1939.)
Children: 4 children:
Hyrum Lorenzo Egan (1872-1952)
Emily Theresa Egan Dayley (1874-1978)
Mary E. Egan Judd (1883-1966)
Vida Valentine Egan Kidd (1885-1980)

Photos

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Hyrum William Egan

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Brief History

The following is taken from Deep Creek Reflections, by Ronald R. Bateman (pg 87):

“Hyrum…married Mary Salome Preator at Deep Creek and raised a family.  He later moved to Goose Creek or Basin, Idaho. His two oldest children, Hyrum L. and Theresa, were born at Deep Creek. Hyrum originally homesteaded a ranch of 120 acres (parts of section 33 and 34) about three miles southeast of his father’s place in Deep Creek. His place was adjacent to Henry T. Goldsmith’s.

His wife, Mary Preator, is listed as donating one dozen eggs to the Indian farm in April of 1877, but none of the Egans are listed in a November 1877 LDS Church membership roster at Ibapah. The last of the Egan family must have left the valley by the fall of 1877.

The departure of the Egans and the closing of the Overland Mail brought about by the transcontinental railroad project marked the end of an exciting era in Deep Creek history. Ibapah was no longer one of the busiest commercial routes leading to the west coast. No more did daily stages roll through. The anger and frustration of the Indians was alleviated for the most part by the operation of the farms and by letting them stay in their native countryside.

Wagon freighting to the mining boom areas in Nevada had increased during the 1860’s and would continue to fill a need in the coming decades. The railroad did not reach outlying areas, but the heavy freight wagons served to fill the void and provided outside contacts for local residents in valleys such as Deep Creek.”

Sources

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Bateman, Ronald R., Deep Creek Reflections, p. 87.

 


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